clementinevonradics

taylovescoffee asked:

Do you have any poems that are too personal to share? Or that were really hard for you to share with your fans?

clementinevonradics answered:

Definitely. I write a lot of poems I never publish, and there are poems I feel vulnerable posting.

I think a large part of the reason I write is I have a very hard time articulating my thoughts and feelings to other people in conversation. Writing gives me a chance sit with my experiences and express them when I’m ready. It’s a vulnerable thing to share them, but maybe a necessary kind of vulnerable.

fishingboatproceeds

as-howarth asked:

Hey John, what is your reaction to the news that the Riverside district has chosen to ban TFIOS from middle school libraries on the grounds that it deals with mortality and sex? I remember your reactions to similar situations concerning your books have been pretty animated and wondered what you thought?

fishingboatproceeds answered:

I guess I am both happy and sad.

I am happy because apparently young people in Riverside, California will never witness or experience mortality since they won’t be reading my book, which is great for them.

But I am also sad because I was really hoping I would be able to introduce the idea that human beings die to the children of Riverside, California and thereby crush their dreams of immortality.

fishingboatproceeds:

zaielle:

Imagine a world where people only die if they know about death. 

(How quickly) would everyone become immortal? What do you think will happen? Will there come a point wherein everyone hides the the concept of death from a generation and the concept will die out? Can you even do that? You can’t teach any form of history, or even family trees, because every previous generation has died (what about pets and other animals? is it only human mortality that counts?). Infant mortality would drop to zero though. 

If people only can die if they know death exist, would anything change at all? 

And so a novel was born.

dropitlikefscottt

Plath often sets off something primal for young women. She expresses powerful, taboo emotions—rage, sorrow, the desire for revenge—in a way that often encourages those young women to take their own inner lives seriously, and to spend quite a lot of time working out how to express them. Those emotions can be powerful and liberating.

This is not to say that there aren’t real criticisms to be made when it comes to Plath’s work, and I realize that women and feminists are often the ones to make them. But making fun of “the girl who thinks she’s Sylvia Plath” is making fun of the girl who takes her inner life seriously; seriously enough to write about it in some pretty stark terms, without feeling embarrassed.

When I was wandering through the library, grabbing anything with a female name on it, I was really looking for teachers. More important, I was looking for women to tell me that writing was possible. I needed evidence that someone like me, a young girl, could one day be a serious writer, and that female voices matter. Sylvia Plath’s poetry was pretty damn compelling evidence of all that.

From Performing Plath by Sady Doyle, at Rookie Mag (via themergirlandthesea)
amandaonwriting
amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977
12 Quotes
I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.
Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.
Source for image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, born 15 September 1977

12 Quotes

  1. I think you travel to search and you come back home to find yourself there.
  2. I have been writing since I was old enough to spell. I have never considered not writing.
  3. The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.
  4. Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in.
  5. Racism should never have happened and so you don’t get a cookie for reducing it.
  6. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign. But stories can also be used to empower, and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people. But stories can also repair that broken dignity.
  7. If you don’t understand, ask questions. If you’re uncomfortable about asking questions, say you are uncomfortable about asking questions and then ask anyway.
  8. Because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye … I realized that people like me, girls with skin the colour of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature.
  9. You can’t write a script in your mind and then force yourself to follow it. You have to let yourself be.
  10. The best novels are those that are important without being like medicine; they have something to say, are expansive and intelligent but never forget to be entertaining and to have character and emotion at their centre.
  11. I write from real life. I am an unrepentant eavesdropper and a collector of stories. I record bits of overheard dialogue.
  12. Our histories cling to us. We are shaped by where we come from.

Adichie is a Nigerian writer. Her best known novels are Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah.

Source for image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write